Roger’s Got Classes Coming Up in Spring 2014

A class in Tucson working with their green canopy pieces
A class in Tucson working with their green canopy pieces

He calls them his “winter/spring” series of classes.

I call them a big waste of time.

Not only does he spend time with other dogs on these ventures–their names are Abe, May, and Haleigh (Zoe’s dog) and I’m sure are very nice dogs, but they’re just not me–he’s also not here and not taking care of me. Last time he was gone? Jenny came over and mocked me.

Yes.

Mocked me.

I started whining and explaining to her that I clearly didn’t deserve mocking because I hadn’t had enough attention and that she needed to give me more, and (get this!) she just whined back. It was very annoying. High-pitched. Hurt my ears. I explained to her that I didn’t like it with more whining, but she just laughed, patted me on the head, and went back to whatever it was she was doing.

Adding shadows to cypress in Images in Glass
Adding shadows to cypress in Images in Glass

I’m thinking that Jenny’s dog might not be the only b*tch in the family… (see previous post).

Anyway, Roger’s got classes coming up at both Ed Hoy’s International in Chicago, and at Pacific Art Glass in Los Angeles.

The Ed Hoy’s classes are Images in Glass (March 5 – 8) and Thinking Painting, Using Fusing (May 13-17).

Images in Glass is the one everyone loves. It’s four days of Roger running around the studio, shouting about technique and palette, and breaking pieces of glass that you’ve just worked really hard to create.

Thinking Painting, Using Fusing is fantastic, too. It’s four days of Roger running around the studio, shouting about technique and palette, and breaking pieces of glass that you’ve just worked really hard to create.

No. Wait. That’s not right. Thinking Painting, Using Fusing is five days of that.

Ha! German Shepherd humor.

Complete cypress trees from Images in Glass Complete cypress trees from Images in Glass
Complete cypress trees from Images in Glass

Images in Glass is just his most popular class because everyone can relate to it – beginners and more advanced glass students alike. He’s developed the particular techniques he teaches during this class over the years. Each one relates back to a specific piece of art and typically has a name relating back to that piece (“Shirikaba,” “Zen Snow,” “Elysian Light”). He’s even developed palettes that relate back to a specific piece of art as well. But the point is that–as students in these classes–you get to learn from each of these techniques and palettes, and leave with four completed works of art. Some might not be gallery-ready, natch, but you can still point at them and say, “Hey, look. I created that and it’s pretty close to awesome.”

Thinking Painting, Using Fusing is the other end of the spectrum. There are no rules. (Well, unless it’s like Roger saying there’s “no rules” for me in the park and that I can run around and do whatever I want, then yells at me for trying to kill a poodle. Sigh. I don’t get it either.) But this class focuses on your choice of project. With Roger’s approval, of course. (See? It’s just like in the park.)

Have a painting or drawing you think would look amazing done in glass, but don’t know how to get started? Roger can help you see each for common elements. (Unless it’s a portrait, of course. He’s horrible at portraits.) You’ll design the composition on paper first, then design that composition for glass. Once that’s done, you’ll break each element down until it’s manageable (and not overwhelming). You’ll test the glass technique and palettes for individual elements by melting stuff in the kilns, and (hopefully) get a chance to put it all together. Basically – all that stuff you learned in Images in Glass? – Roger teaches you the process that he goes through to develop those individual techniques so that you can do it yourself.

Another happy student!
Another happy student!

Warning: he never expects to finish a project in five days (trust me, I know) so you shouldn’t either.

The Projects Class (March 19 – 23) only happens in Los Angeles at Pacific Art Glass. This is because they have crazy space available. That project you wanted to make ten times bigger and didn’t finish in Thinking Painting, Using Fusing? Yep. Here’s your chance. Pacific Art Glass has lots of room, plenty of glass, and tons of kiln space. Roger will serve as your guide as you attempt to recreate your concept in glass. Big glass. (Ha! This is funny to me because typically I serve as his guide to the park… Oh, never mind. More German Shepherd humor.)

This is Thinking Painting, Using Fusing – Extreme Makeover Edition. You want to make a 4 foot tall doggy door in glass using bamboo as inspiration? Bring it. He’ll tell you why it’s a horrible idea and why you should make something else instead.

Working with Stacey on her piece in the Projects Class
Working with Stacey on her piece in the Projects Class

The nice thing about this class? It’s a never-ending Open Studio. Roger might not live in LA anymore, but he flies down enough to provide these classes once every three months or so. (Trust me. I know.) So you can come back again if you’ve hit a rough patch and he’ll help you through it.

Not that I get any help through my rough patches. Nope. I whine and get a stupid pat on my head.

Ingrid the Studio Dog says she is Roger’s companion, advisor, and motivator. OK. That last part she made up. She mostly sleeps. Until it’s time to bark at/intimidate the UPS man, mailman, or cat. And even then she’s darn cute doing it.

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