Roger Thomas glass Op. 582 Isthmus process from the edge

Winter 2017 Update from Ingrid

Inspiration for Op 582 Isthmus by Roger Thomas
Inspiration for Op 582 Isthmus

Roger tends to take longer to create his pieces these days, even with inspiration like the photo from the Columbia Slough. I’m not complaining. I’m getting into middle age for a dog (the dreaded vet has the audacity to call me “senior”), and I don’t mind things taking longer. It gives me the ability to document and record the process for Roger’s pieces more, which means I get to see the magic happen. (OK. So really I’m sleeping most of the time. But I witness magic. Honest!)

Witnessing magic…

Op 582 Isthmus process placing the boulders
Placing the boulders

And really, I think that Roger’s work has gotten even better since he’s spending more time agonizing over it. The Agony and the Ecstasy, right? Not that Roger is anywhere close to Michelangelo. However, he’s brooding and artistic (in his own way) and definitely has talent. Crazy talent, I call it.

He created a work called Isthmus earlier this fall, and it’s one of my favorites. I show it off on the website whenever I have a chance. Oh. Wait. I don’t have fingers to access a browser. And can’t type in a URL. Whatever. I depend on my people to show it off for me. I also depend on my people to pronounce it for me. Because honestly. Who can say isthmus?

The whole process was amazing. First of all, he had to create the sense of depth without his usual technique of creating depth. (That means the piece wasn’t over an inch thick. A win for all of us. Artist assistant, shipping agent, gallery, and client.)

Op 582 Isthmus figuring out the reflection
Figuring out the reflection

Then he created all of the components. He strategically (and artistically) positioned all of the rocks/boulders and trees. And he created the reflection in the water. This is all done backwards since Roger builds his pieces upside down. The top is the bottom. The front is the back. However you want to describe it, it’s challenging. Creating backwards and upside-down isn’t easy.

Creating glass art this way is tricky.

Yep. Tricky. Just look at how many Sharpies must have suffered during this process! Sharpies (to their detriment) write on glass and the color evaporates during the firing process, so they’re perfect for this. Roger favors the blue ones. First of all, he has an entire 24 pack of them. They litter the studio.

I wish my favorites treats littered the studio like the blue Sharpies do. Hopefully this can be remedied. (Please consult this page on Amazon and gift to Ingrid via Roger Thomas Glass.)

For the time being, let’s have a moment of silence for the blue Sharpies that sacrificed themselves for Roger’s art. (And for my sinuses. Which suffer from the distinct aroma of Sharpies.) And then let’s admire the art. Because it’s worthy of admiration.

Opus 582 Isthmus glass artwork by Roger V Thomas

My favorite thing to hear from people when they see it–?

“That’s made of glass…?!?”

Yes. Made of glass.

A painting that is made of glass.

Agonize over THAT, Michelangelo.

 

 

Ingrid the Studio Dog says she is Roger's companion, advisor, and motivator. OK. That last part she made up. She mostly sleeps. Until it's time to bark at/intimidate the UPS man, mailman, or cat. And even then she's darn cute doing it.

2 thoughts on “Winter 2017 Update from Ingrid

  1. BEAUTIFUL!!!! Roger, I know how hard it is to paint a reflection but to do it backwards is amazing.
    Best wishes for 2018.

  2. That is a fantastic piece Roger, I love the rocks and reflection. I am also experimenting with something new, very loosely based on Paul Messink’s technique. Again, as with the sgraffito technique I am able to get 2 layers thick. If you wish to see some of my work please go to my Painted Daisy Art Glass facebook page. All the best.
    Patricia Anderson
    Winnipeg, Canada

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